5 Techniques You Must Learn to be a Chef

5.) Breading

To start, get your breading station ready. Fill up the first dish with flour. In a second dish, create an egg wash by whisking eggs with a tiny trickle of water, milk or any other liquid or seasoning of your choosing. In a third dish, fill it with breadcrumbs. Begin by dredging a slab of meat in the flour. Dredging means to lightly coat the meat with said flour, and then shake out any excess. Doing this omits a lot of the moisture from the outside of the piece of meat and gives it something for the egg wash to stick onto. The second step is to dip this piece of meat into the egg wash, once again letting the extra excess shake off. By then, you’ll essentially have a paste for the crumbs to stick to. Finally, press the meat against the crumbs, remembering to coat evenly.

4.) Browning/Searing

To brown meat, heat up a pan that is entirely dry, then pour in enough olive oil to lightly coat the surface of the pan. If you’re using meat that has a lot of fat on it, however, you can pass this step and stick the meat right to the dry pan. The oil in the pan should heat up to the point where it is simmering but is not smoking. Insert your ingredient right onto the pan. At first, it will make a hissing sound,  but let it sizzle until a golden brown crust begins to emerge.

3.) Onion Dicing

Peel the skin off an onion, and beginning with one-half, let the root end face away from you.  Holding the onion down, make vertical chops along the onion half, spacing them depending on thickness.  Next, make horizontal cuts. With your knife parallel to the cutting board, chop the onion, separating them according to the dice size you want. Finally, cut the onion in the other direction, letting the diced onions in each layer go as you chop towards the root end. When you’ve reached the last slice, lay it down on the cutting board and make slices in both directions to bring the dice to an elegant close.

2.) Folding

Add whipped cream or whipped egg whites into a thicker batter or custard. With egg whites, the air that has been inserted into the whipped whites serves as leavening in order to assist cakes or souffles to rise. Slowly pour about a 25% of the egg whites or whipped cream on top of the thicker batter. Using a rubber spatula, gently reach with a spatula to the bottom of the bowl and pull some of the batters up along the edge of the bowl and over the whites in the center.

 1.) Pan Sauce

Begin by sauteing a bunch of diced shallots or other aromatics for the added flavor, either in the leftover fat from browning the meat or in olive oil. Next, pour in a liquid and let it simmer. To finish, pour a few cold cubes of butter in. Add any extra seasoning in and you’ve got pan sauce.

Here is a video that covers tips on mastering basic cooking skills.